May 302017
 

seahorse necklace cover

It probably won’t come as a big surprise to those of you who have been following me for a while to find out that this necklace started with the ceramic seahorse beads. I find interesting and creative materials to be so inspiring!

Although I’m really happy with the way the seahorse and multiple strands came out on this necklace, I’m not sure if I’m totally thrilled with the large lampwork bead. I don’t know that I  achieved the visual balance I was looking for. Let me know in the comments what you think.

Of course you could use this design as the basis for designing with any beads that you have. This is another fun one for going through your stash and seeing what you can find that works together.

I’m actually rethinking my issue with having the seahorses go sideways around my wrist. (I know, it’s silly.) One thing I love about these flat types of beads is that they make extremely comfortable bracelets. If I do something with my three remaining seahorse beads I’ll be sure to post it on Facebook and Instagram for you to see.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Seahorse Necklace-Beaded Beading Jewelry Tutorial at YouTube.

Dec 302016
 

ff q&a supplies & stringing

It occurred to me the other day that I hadn’t done any question and answers videos in quite some time. Sorry about that!

Even though I try to answer most questions in the comments sections of the videos, it’s always nice to answer them in a video for everyone to see because if one person has a question it’s likely more people have the same one.

In today’s Q & A I answer questions about where to find the supplies that I show in videos, how to finish up crimped bead stringing and why sometimes jewelry designers weave the end of the wire back through a few of their final beads.

Here are links to some of the supplies I like to use in bead stringing:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Q&A-Where to Find Jewelry Supplies, How To Finish Bead Stringing-Friday Findings video at YouTube.

Jan 052015
 

Ombre Necklace

This necklace is all about the beads and the ombre shading from dark to light.  Once you’ve chosen all your beads the little silver spacers tie everything together and the stringing is simple.

As usual I chose to make mine adjustable. In the video I show you a trick for using fine chain, rather than the chunky I usually use, and still have a necklace that’s adjustable in length.

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

You can watch the Ombre Blend Necklace Tutorial over at YouTube.

Materials:

  • 10-12 dark blue beads
  • 10-12 medium dark blue beads
  • 10-12 medium blue beads
  • 10-12 medium light blue beads
  • 10-12 light blue beads
  • 3mm silver spacer beads
  • bead stringing wire
  • 2 crimps
  • 2 crimp covers
  • 2 wire protectors
  • silver plated chain, fine gauge
  • 4mm jump rings
  • lobster clasp

Tools:

  • chain nose pliers
  • crimping pliers
  • wire cutters
  1. Cut the fine gauge chain into 1 inch pieces. Reconnect the pieces with 4mm jump rings to make chains the length you need.
  2. Onto bead stringing wire slide a crimp, then slide wire into one end of wire protector and out the other. Add one end of your piece of chain to the wire protector. Slide the wire end back through the crimp and bring crimp to within 1/8-inch of wire protector. Flatten crimp and squeeze ends of wire protector together. Trim shorter piece of wire close to crimp. Cover crimp with a crimp cover by picking up with crimping pliers, sliding over flattened crimp and gently squeezing pliers. Use crimping pliers to shape cover into a round bead shape if necessary.
  3. Slide a spacer bead onto your wire. Add all your lightest color beads, each separated by a spacer bead. Continue to add beads from lightest to darkest,  each separated by a spacer bead. End with a spacer bead.
  4. Repeat step 2 to finish end, adding a lobster clasp to end of one of piece of chain.
Nov 102014
 

tribal swirl bracelet

Sure we’ve had fun making our own jewelry, but have you ever thought about making your own beads?

Just think of the possibilities,  you can choose any colors for the base, any colors for the accents, make them any size and shape you want. What’s not to love?

In this video I’ll show you how to add the swirl pattern that gives these beads their tribal feel. I highly recommend using metallic or pearlized clays for this step. I’ll also show you how to make perfect, consistent size & shape beads using a bead roller.

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

You can watch the Tribal Swirls Beads & Bracelet Video Tutorial over at YouTube.

Materials for beads:

Materials for bracelet:

  • 6 9 mm x 16 mm oval beads (purchased or made yourself with tutorial)
  • 7 4 mm glass bicone beads
  • 14 4 mm x 6 mm copper rondelle spacer beads
  • 2 inches copper chain
  • lobster clasp
  • jump ring
  • 11 inches bead stringing wire
  • 2 crimps
  • 2 crimp covers
  • 2 wire protectors

Tools:

  • chain nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • crimping pliers

See video for complete instructions.

Oct 272014
 

Blue Skies Bead Bracelet

I LOVE the colors in these blue sky jasper beads and copper seemed like the perfect accent for them. This stringing project is a little more involved than many I’ve done, but the results are well worth it.

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

You can watch the Blue Skies Bead Bracelet Video Tutorial over at YouTube

Materials:

  • 34 12mm blue sky jasper lentil beads
  • 3 12-15mm copper beads
  • 5 6mm x 4mm copper spacer beads
  • 22 5mm x 2mm copper daisy spacer beads
  • 6 crimps
  • 6 crimp covers
  • 6 wire protectors
  • 2 jump rings
  • 2-inch length copper chain
  • 1 copper head pin
  • copper lobster clasp
  • 30 inches 0.48mm 21-strand bead stringing wire

Tools:

  • round nose pliers
  • chain nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • crimping pliers
  • Bead Stoppers

See video for detailed directions.

 

 

Sep 082014
 

Here’s another necklace I’ll be teaching soon at my local Joann’s.  We’ll be focusing on the basics of bead stringing.  

bead-stringing-necklace

As I mention in the video, the stringing of beads is the easy part.  Just use the wire like a needle & thread and slide on your beads.  The real work is in the arranging, designing and of course, making sure you have secure closures.

bead-stringing-close-up

We start out by using quite inexpensive beads (would you believe most of those purple ones are plastic?) but you can still get a pretty piece of jewelry.  Plus it’s good to learn on something that won’t break your heart if the closures let go.  🙂

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

YOu can watch Bead Stringing 101- Beaded Necklace Video Tutorial over at YouTube.

Materials:

  • 7” strand assorted 10mm-15mm beads in colors of your choice
  • 1 strand 4mm crystal beads to coordinate with 7” strand
  • 1 strand 6mm crystal beads to coordinate with 7” strand
  • 1 hank clear large glass seed beads
  • 1 spool bead stringing wire (.018, 49 strand)
  • silver plated lobster clasp
  • 3 – 6mm silver plated jump rings
  • 4- 2x3mm silver plated crimp beads
  • 4mm silver plated round spacer beads (the package I got had 16)
  • optional (4-6 inch piece of chunky chain)

Tools:

  • crimping pliers
  • chain nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • bead design board
  • Bead Bugs Bead Stoppers
  • tape measure 

To make necklace:

  1. Open assorted bead strand onto longest channel in bead design board.
  2. Open each strand of crystal beads, silver plated beads and large seed beads into a separate compartment in bead design board.
  3. Remove 3-5 beads from Jesse James assortment to use in second strand. Arrange these in another channel in board.
  4. Arrange crystal beads and silver plated beads around focal beads in a pleasing design.
  5. Use large glass seed beads to fill in length of necklace, especially going around the back.
  6. Leaving bead stringing wire on the spool, string beads onto wire. When length and arrangement are to your satisfaction, cut off the wire, leaving 3 inches extra wire on each end.
  7. Make sure to secure each end with a Bead Bug.
  8. Repeat stringing, cutting and clamping for second strand of beads. It should be slightly shorter than the first strand.
  9. Remove bead stopper from one end of longer bead strand. Slide on a crimp tube and a soldered jump ring.
  10. Slide wire back through crimp tube, pull snug to jump ring. Use crimping pliers to squeeze crimp, first using round portion then “U” shaped portion of pliers.
  11. Test hold of crimp by pulling on jump ring. Once it is secure trim excess wire.
  12. Repeat steps 9-11 to add one end of shorter strand to same jump ring.
  13. Repeat steps 9-12 to add two remaining wire ends to another jump ring.
  14. Use wire cutters to make a split in a jump ring. Use this jump ring to attach lobster clasp to one of the soldered jump rings.
  15. Optional:  To add length to your necklace and make it adjustable, use a split jump ring to attach a piece of chain to the other soldered jump ring.
Apr 102014
 

Who says jewelry has to be all one thing or another? This fun bracelet is half beaded and half dangly charm bracelet. It’s also a fun way to use your stash.

half n half bead & charm bracelet still

My furry little friend, Cheech, makes a cameo appearance helping me out with those cat & bird charms. 🙂

You can watch the Half Bead-Half Charm Bracelet Video Tutorial over at YouTube.

Happy creating!

Materials:

  • 3-4 inches chunky chain
  • 3-8 charms
  • head pins and/or jump rings as needed to attach charms
  • 5-10 approximately 10mm beads
  • 6-11 spacer beads
  • toggle clasp
  • 2 crimp beads
  • 2 crimp bead covers
  • 2 wire protectors
  • bead stringing wire

Tools:

  • chain nose pliers
  • round nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • crimping pliers
  • ruler

Instructions:

  1. Determine desired finished length of bracelet, subtract 1-inch for the clasp. Divide this number by two and string beads and spacers onto the beading wire to that length.
  2. On one end of the wire string a crimp bead and a wire protector. Slide an end link of chain into the wire protector and slide the wire back through the crimp bead. Use chain nose pliers to flatten the crimp and cover with a crimp bead cover. Use crimping pliers to gently close the crimp cover.
  3. Repeat step two on other end of beads, adding round end of toggle clasp instead of a link of chain.
  4. Check fit of bracelet on wrist and remove links of chain to make bracelet the  correct length. Use a jump ring to attach bar end of toggle clasp to last length of chain.
  5. Attach charms to chain with jump rings.
  6. If necessary, slide charms onto head pins. Use chain nose pliers to grasp wire just at point where it exits last bead.  Bend wire at 90° angle.  Grasp bend with round nose pliers and wrap wire around pliers as far as possible to start to make a loop.  Reposition pliers to finish loop.  Slightly twist loop open and insert link of chain that you want charm to dangle from. Close loop and hold with chain nose pliers. Use another pair of chain nose to wrap remaining wire around wire below 90° bend. Use wire cutters to trim, if necessary. Use chain nose pliers to tuck in end.
Jan 142014
 

Hello Wednesday, again!  Sorry it’s been a week since I’ve posted.  Things are settling down and I’m trying to get back into the normal swing of things after the holidays and then moving my son twice in one week.

My son, Dan, moved twice, but his cats moved only once, and are here with us for the foreseeable future. His two kitties are finally starting to get comfortable in our house. So comfortable that overnight somebody knocked all the stuff off my ironing board, including a magnetic pincushion full of pins.  Good thing we wear slippers around here! Our two cats are 9 & 10, middle-aged and mellow; Dan’s are not quite two, and I’d forgotten how much energy young cats have. They are a lot of fun, and sweethearts to boot.

woyww jewelry design and dragon collections

Anyhow, my desk today shows I’m working on a couple jewelry pieces.  (I’m waiting for the cats to discover this table with the beads. Oh boy!)  I’ll be teaching basic stringing and basic wire wrapping in upcoming videos and also will be teaching these as classes at Joann’s.

In the upper left is a beret I just finished knitting.  It was  a free pattern from Ravelry and quite simple & quick to make.

P1000533_small2

This one in the lighter colors shows the pattern better than mine.  I LOVE how the yarn makes stripes.

Btw, have you ever heard of the Collectionary?  It was just brought to my attention and it’s an amazing site.  If there’s anything, I mean anything you collect, you can find it here.  Trains? Yes.  Sewing machines? Yup. Star Wars? Naturally.  Cats? Which one do you want, Garfield, Cheshire, Grumpy Cat or the Cat in the Hat?  I’ve yet to think of something to search for that they didn’t have a collection of.

dragons

If you like dragons (and you know I do!) you’ll love their Dragons Collectionary.  I’ve even added several of my own dragon creations to their collection. 

Are you in the January slump? Feeling in need of creative inspiration?  Check out the work spaces of lots of creative people from all over the world at Julia’s giant weekly blog hop. We like to call it What’s on Your Workdesk Wednesday. Be warned, you might just get addicted.  🙂

Happy Creating!