Sorry I haven’t written much in the past week, it’s been a kinda weird time around here. My nephew has cancer, he’s home on hospice, the end is very near, and he’s only 37.  It’s just so hard to believe.

In amidst the sadness there have been several happy little things.  Like the UPS truck pulling into my driveway in the afternoon.  I knew my entire Amazon order had come, so didn’t know what this delivery was about.

Good news?  Bad news?  Uh-oh.

may-arts-ribbon-prize

It was this, my prize from May Arts ribbon for being a runner up in the February challenge.

Whoo-hoo, 32 yards of white silk ribbon, just waiting to be dyed, inked or otherwise colored into whatever shade I need.  Awesomeness!

Then there was this.

wedding-gown-for-fabric

Why did this make me happy?

Well, you see, I decided to join the 1912 Sewing Project, a group dedicated to sewing the patterns from the 1912 year of La Mode Illustree, in conjunction with the anniversary of the Titanic.

This is the first pattern I received.

1912-project-princess-slip-pattern

Isn’t that pretty?  I was happy to get it, and excited to get started, but bummed to discover I needed nearly six yards of fabric.  This is for something I don’t need and probably won’t wear.  It’s just a challenge, and something interesting to try.  I can’t really afford to be buying that much material for this kind of thing, ya know?

So anyhow, back to this.

wedding-gown-for-fabric-2

A couple of weeks ago a lady at church asked me if I’d like an old wedding gown for the fabric.  She said it was stained and torn in places, but I could possibly use the fabric for linings and such.  Me, turn down fabric?  Nuh-uh.

I then proceeded to completely forget about it until my husband plunked two largish boxes in my sewing room last Sunday.

In fact, I had so completely forgotten about it that that very day I’d written “check fabric stash for fabric and lace for 1912 slip” on my beginning of the week list.

wedding-gown-for-fabric-1

I hadn’t even gotten started on that list and there it was, yards and yards of fabric, and lace, all perfect for the project.

I felt so incredibly blessed.

But the biggest happy thing so far this week, is the littlest of all.  Or, perhaps, the other way ’round.

gold-heart-earrings

These earrings, which hubby got me for our first anniversary (nearly 24 years ago), have been missing for several months.  I was heartbroken, had given them up for good, and was just thankful that among all the new jewelry I’m constantly buying and/or making he’d likely never notice their absence.

Yesterday I pulled out a bracelet I hadn’t worn in a long time, and there they were, clinging to it.  You should have seen my smile.

It could have lit up a room.  🙂

It’s definitely the little things in life that can make us the most happy.

Wishing you all a happy and creative week.

 

 

Like my tutorials? Support me on Patreon to get up to TWO bonus videos every month!

3 thoughts on “The Little Things…

  1. Oh my goodness. I’m so sorry to hear about your nephew. I hope he has family around him.

    I can’t wait to see your Princess Slip. And if that illustration shows a 36-inch bust, then I am a size 3. 😐

    1. My nephew’s mom (Gary’s sister) is on family medical leave and is taking care of him. He has two brothers in the area who visit often. I married into a family with seven siblings, so he has lots of aunts, uncles and cousins around.

      I learned an interesting thing about the sizing on the slip. That 36-inch measurement in the band, or under bust measurement. I’m glad I read that before doing my resizing of the pattern.

  2. I am so glad I started following your blog! You’ve got some awesome things on here. I adore the slip, and as for that gorgeous wedding dress fabric… and the lovely ribbon too. Nothing like silk, is there.

    I am very sorry to hear about your nephew, Such a terrible time for you all, and I do hope he is not suffering too much. My thoughts and prayers are with you.

    Shoshi

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.