Apr 182017
 

dogwood necklace cover

I named today’s project after the dogwood tree that will be blooming soon in my yard. Every year in early May I so enjoy its beautiful pink and white blossoms. These pink ceramic beads, white crystal and crackled beads and the white enameled metal focal all bring to mind the springtime beauty of the dogwood.

long necklace

This necklace design began with a photo I found online. My apologies, but I cannot find the original source. It appears to be from a catalog, and not a jewelry designer, though. If you recognize it, please let me know so I can give proper credit.

dogwood necklace long

I was intrigued by the way the largest beads are not at the usual center front position. My version is a little bit more asymmetrical than the inspiration piece. Even if I did have two of those white metal flowers, I’m not sure that I would have used them both. The almost perfectly balanced design is more interesting, I think, than complete symmetry.

This piece goes together quickly, especially if you use the One Step Looper tool. Be sure to double check the security of all your loop and chain connections.

Tools & Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Dogwood Necklace-Beaded Jewelry Tutorial at YouTube.

Nov 242014
 

blushing pinks necklace

Today’s project is a study in simplifying.  Rather then seeing how many elements you can add to a piece, how about figuring out how many you can eliminate?

I used rose quartz round beads, but you could just as easily use pearls. Instead of the ceramic beads, why not try some large, funky nuggets? While designing this I tried out a huge black lampworked bead that would have been interesting, if only I’d had other beads to go with it.

So, use this design as a jumping off point for your own jewelry, whether it be quiet & elegant, bright & crazy, or something else completely. 🙂

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

You can watch the Blushing Pinks Necklace Video Tutorial over at YouTube.

Materials:

  • 3 31mm x 14mm ceramic beads
  • several inches of clear seed beads (if needed)
  • 4 copper spacer beads
  • 18 10mm rose quartz  beads
  • 21 8mm rose quartz beads
  • 25 inches bead stringing wire
  • 2 wire protectors
  • 4 crimps
  • 4 crimp covers
  • 2-3 inch piece of chunky chain
  • clasp
  • head pin

Tools:

Directions:

  1. Add a Bead Stopper near the center of bead stringing wire. String on one copper spacer and seed beads, if needed (see video for details.) Add ceramic bead and another spacer.
  2. Repeat to add 4 spacers and 3 ceramic beads to wire.
  3. On one side of ceramic beads string 9 10 mm rose quartz beads, then 10 8 mm rose quartz beads.
  4. Onto bead stringing wire slide 2 crimps, then slide wire into one end of wire protector and out the other. Add loop of your clasp to the wire protector. Slide the wire end back through the crimps and bring crimps to within 1/8-inch of wire protector. Flatten crimps and squeeze ends of wire protector together. Cover crimps with  crimp covers by picking up with crimping pliers, sliding over flattened crimp and gently squeezing pliers. Use crimping pliers to shape covers into round bead shapes if necessary.
  5. Remove bead stopper and repeat steps 3 & 4 to finish other end of necklace, adding piece of chain instead of clasp in step 4.
  6. Slide remaining 8mm rose quartz bead into headpin. Use chain nose pliers to grasp wire just at point where it exits bead.  Bend wire at 90° angle.  Grasp bend with round nose pliers and wrap wire around pliers as far as possible to start to make a loop.  Reposition pliers to finish loop.  Slightly twist loop open and insert end link of piece of chain. Close loop and hold with chain nose pliers. Use another pair of chain nose to wrap remaining wire around wire below 90° bend. Use wire cutters to trim, if necessary. Use chain nose pliers to tuck in end.

 

May 272013
 

Here’s  a quick and easy necklace tutorial for you.  The texture of the hammered stainless steel links gives it quite a bit of sparkle.

hammered-steel-rings-necklace-3

It felt like it needed just a little bit of color, so I wired up a few Swarovski crystal bicones.

hammered-steel-rings-necklace-2

 You can choose to make your necklace symmetrical or arrange your links asymmetrically, like I did.  Whichever you like better.

hammered-steel-rings-necklace-1

The only thing that’s time consuming about this necklace is opening and closing all the jump rings and wire wrapping the crystals; otherwise it’s quite quick.

Here’s where you can watch the video over at my YouTube channel:

Hammered Links Necklace Video Tutorial

Happy Memorial Day and Happy Creating!

Hammered Links Necklace:

Tools & Supplies:

  • 4 30mm hammered metal rings
  • 4 30mm x 20mm hammered metal ovals
  • 12 16mm hammered metal rings
  • 12 14mm x 10 mm hammered metal ovals
  • approximately 30 7mm jump rings
  • 3-4 inch length chunky chain
  • lobster clasp
  • 7 6mm top drilled Swarovski crystals
  • 22 gauge craft wire
  • round nose pliers
  • 2 pair chain nose pliers
  • flush wire cutters

Directions:

To wire wrap crystals:

  1. Working from the spool of wire slide a piece end of wire into hole of bead, leaving ¼ inch sticking out on one side. Bend both wire ends up at 90-degree angle to hole of bead. Bend wires over top of bead, making a triangle shape. Bend remaining ends of wire up, perpendicular to bead hole. Trim shorter wire to 1/8 inch from bend. 
  1. Bend longer wire at 90° angle. Use round nose pliers to make a loop. Wrap wire around bends and down to cover bead hole. This can be done with neat, tight wraps, or in “messy wraps.” Use wire cutters to trim wire when wraps are complete.  Use chain nose pliers to tuck in wire end.

To make necklace:

  1. Arrange rings and crystals in desired order.
  2. Attach links and crystals together with jump rings.
  3. Use a jump ring to attach length of chain to one end of necklace.
  4. Attach lobster clasp to other end of necklace with a jump ring
Feb 162013
 

Once again, I’m struck by the beauty of the humble seed bead. It’s amazing how elegant these simple components look when strung together in multiples.

brown-twisted-strand-necklace-still

This necklace began its life as necklace from a store.  I always liked the colors and the interesting beaded bail, however, it had a cheap plastic pendant that didn’t do much for the whole look.  Cuz, well…. it looked cheap…. and plastic.

Jewelry doesn’t have to be made of expensive materials to make me happy, but it has to look nice.  Ya know?

brown-twisted-strand-necklace-still-close-up

Take another look at the jewelry pieces in your collection that don’t quite do it for you.  A little tweaking might be all they need.  🙂

Happy creating!

I’m sorry that video embedding is still not working in WordPress.  This link will bring you to the Twisted Multi Strand Bead Necklace video over on YouTube.  While you’re there be sure to check out all my other videos and subscribe to my channel so you don’t miss anything.

Materials:

    • 15-inches each of 6 different seed and small beads each strung onto 22-inches of beading thread
    • 4-inches of one type of beads strung onto 15-inches of beading thread (for bail)
    • 2 – 2-inch pieces wire (headpins with the heads cut off work great)
    • 2 bead caps
    • 3 or 4 jump rings
    • 2 – 4” pieces chain
    • lobster clasp
    • pendant
    • 2 pair chain nose pliers
    • round nose pliers
    • wire cutters
    • awl
    • hemostats, beads bugs or other clamping tool for holding thread ends
    • Fray Check 

To make necklace:

  1. Grasp one end of each of six 15-inch strands of beads with hemostats or bead clamping tool. Gather together opposite ends and tie in a knot. Apply a drop of fray check and allow to dry. Trim thread ends close to knot. 
  2. Gather remaining thread ends all together. Holding the threads close to last bead on each strand, give each strand a tug. This will make all strands even. Tie thread ends in a knot, using awl to place knot close to beads. Apply a drop of fray check and allow to dry. Trim thread ends close to knot. 
  3. Use pliers to make a 90° bend 3/8-inch from end of 2-inch piece of wire. Grasp 3/8-inch section with round nose pliers and twist to make a U-shaped hook. Leave the hook open slightly for now. Repeat with second piece of wire. 
  4. Slide hook of one wire through bead strands at knot with three strands on either side of hook. Use chain nose pliers to close hook into a loop. Slide on bead cap onto wire. Use chain nose pliers to grasp wire just at point where it exits bead cap.  Bend wire at 90° angle.  Grasp bend with round nose pliers and wrap wire around pliers as far as possible to start to make a loop.  Reposition pliers to finish loop.  Use wire cutters to trim wire where it crosses beginning of loop. 
  5. Repeat to add wire hook and bead cap to other end of bead strands. 
  6. Add 4-inch piece of chain to each end of necklace with a jump ring. Add clasp to one end of chain with a jump ring. Add a jump ring to remaining end of chain if necessary. 

To make bail:

  1. Make a single tie (not a knot) in 4-inch strand of beads. Pull on tie to bring beads into a loop. Fold loop in half to find center opposite tie. Bring one thread end under the center and tie threads again. As you pull up the thread the beads will form two loops, a figure eight shape. 
  2. Fold these loops so they lie side by side. These two loops are your bail. 
  3. Knot the threads, apply a drop of fray check and allow to dry. Once dry, trim thread ends. 
  4. Attach the pendant to the bail with a large jump ring, then slide the necklace through the bail to complete the necklace.
Feb 052013
 

“Bead Soup,” simply put, is a collection of beads.  It can be completely random, like saving all your extra beads in a bowl, then seeing what you can do with them.  Or they can be planned assortments with contrasting or complementary colors.  Usually there’s a interesting mix of shapes, sizes and textures of beads.

bead-soup-beaded-necklace-still

Often you’ll find these assortments calling your name at bead shows or in craft stores.  (What?  Beads don’t call to You?)

This  necklace was made from a purple and yellow packet that leaped into my cart, erm, that is – I just couldn’t resist it.

bead-soup-beaded-necklace-still-hanging

I decided to keep the project simple by just stringing 4 strands of beads onto beading wire, adding bead caps, a pendant and some chain around back to finish.

You know me, it’s got to be adjustable.  🙂

bead-soup-beaded-necklace-still-close-up

As you’ll see in the video, I had a hard time deciding on a pendant until the beads were strung.  Then the choice was obvious.  This is a case of following the excellent advice I once heard to “Make visual decision visually.”  It seems “duh” but often we try to guess without actually seeing.

Anyhow, enjoy the video, and give it a try for yourself.

WordPress has been having issues lately with embedding videos.  So instead of having it here on the blog, today you’ll have to go watch it on my YouTube channel.  Sorry for any inconvenience!

Happy creating.  🙂

****************************************************

Bead Soup Beaded Necklace

Materials:

  • a “bead soup” assortment of small beads (usually in 50-60 gram containers)
  • 4 20-inch pieces beading wire
  • 2 – 2 inch pieces wire (headpins with the heads cut off work great)
  • 8 crimp beads
  • 2 bead caps
  • 3 or 4 jump rings
  • 2 – 3” pieces chain
  • lobster clasp
  • pendant and jump ring or bail to attach to necklace
  • 2 pair chain nose pliers
  • round nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • crimping tool, if desired
  • hemostats, beads bugs or other clamping tool for holding beading wire ends

To make necklace:

  1. Randomly string 16-inches of beads from assortment onto each 20-inch piece of beading wire.
  2. Use round or chain nose pliers to make a U-shaped hook in one end of each 2-inch piece of wire.
  3. Slide a crimp bead onto a wire, then slide the wire back through the crimp, leaving a 1/8-1/4 inch loop of wire.  Flatten crimp bead with chain nose pliers or crimp with crimping tool.  Repeat with one end of each of remaining three strands of beads. Trim excess wire 1/8-inch from crimp.
  4. Slide all four loops onto a U-shaped hook, then use chain nose pliers to close U into a loop.  Slide end of wire through a bead cap.
  5. Use chain nose pliers to grasp wire just at point where it exits bead cap.  Bend wire at 90° angle.  Grasp bend with round nose pliers and wrap wire around pliers as far as possible to start to make a loop.  Reposition pliers to finish loop.  Use wire cutters to trim wire where it crosses beginning of loop.
  6. Repeat steps 3-5 to add crimp beads, wire hook and bead cap to other ends of bead strands, leaving about 1/8-inch slack in each wire.
  7. Add 3-inch piece of chain to each end of necklace with a jump ring.  Add clasp to one end of chain with a jump ring.  Add a jump ring to remaining end of chain if necessary.
  8. Attach the pendant to one strand of necklace with a large jump ring.  (Or use whatever means is appropriate for your pendant.  If your bail is closed, you’ll need to slide it onto one of the strands of beads before completing step 6.)
Dec 242012
 

This necklace is a knock-off of one I bought at my local Fashion Bug.  (Which, sadly, is going out of business.  Why are all the good stores closing? Boo.  Hiss.)

multi-strand-chain-necklace-flat

Anyhow, I was happy to get a few bargains and some great jewelry ideas.  The layered chain look is very popular right now, and I love the addition of a single strand of beads.

multi-strand-chain-necklace-still

The original was in gunmetal silver with red rhinestone accents, so it seemed like antique gold with purple accents would be a perfect alternate.

multi-strand-chain-necklace-close

Click on any of the photos for a super-duper up close and personal peek.  (Yeah, sorry about the cat hair.  As much as I try to discourage it, my cat likes to sleep inside my little photo booth.  Silly boy, he is.)

Happy creating!

Materials:

  • 74-inch length chunky chain, cut into 45-, 15- and 14-inch pieces
  • 55-inch length fine chain, cut into 12.5-, 12-, 11-, 10- and 9.5-inch pieces
  • lobster clasp
  • 13 inches of beads and spacers, strung on 17 inches tiger tail or other beading wire
  • two crimp beads
  • two split rings
  • 5mm jump rings
  • two pair chain nose pliers
  • crimping pliers, if desired
  • wire cutters
  • four pieces scrap wire or four twist ties

Instructions:

  1. Mark 45-inch length of chain at 9.5 inches and 13 inches from each end with scrap wire or twist ties.
  2. Attach each end of 15-inch length of chain to a link at the 13-inch marks on the 45-inch chain.
  3. Attach ends of 14-inch length of chain each one link above 15-inch length.
  4. Slide a crimp bead and a split ring onto one end of tiger tail with strung beads. Slide wire back through crimp bead. Flatten with chain nose pliers, or crimp with crimping pliers. String extra wire through ½ inches of beads; then trim excess.
  5. Repeat step 4 to attach split ring to other end of tiger tail.
  6. Attach strung beads to 45-inch length of chain by split rings in same manner as 14- and 15-inch lengths of chain.
  7. Use jump rings to attach lengths of fine chain to 45-inch length of chain in same manner, working up the links, starting with longest length and spacing evenly to place shortest length at mark at 9.5 inches.
  8. Use a jump ring to attach lobster clasp to one end of 45-inch chain.

 

Dec 202012
 

This necklace is a remake of a favorite I’ve had for years.  I think I love it so much because it’s simple, yet funky and it goes with everything.

funky-random-bead-necklace-006

Stringing bead dangles onto a ring is a great way to use up single, perhaps orphan beads. (You know, those beads that you love, but don’t know what to do with and can’t bear to part with?)

funky-random-bead-necklace-011

Just pull together an assortment of sizes, shapes and colors that you like and you’ve got something very cool. (In fact, the more assorted the beads, the better it looks.)

Happy creating!

Materials:

  • 36-inches rat tail cord
  • two “cord grabber” findings
  • lobster clasp
  • 1-inch metal ring
  • three jump rings
  • three head pins
  • four focal beads with 10-12 assorted accent beads
  • chain nose pliers
  • round nose pliers
  • wire cutters

Instructions:

  1. Set aside one focal bead and two accent beads with large holes to decorate cord of necklace.
  2. Arrange remaining beads into three groups of bead dangles. Slide each set of bead dangles onto a head pin. To make each head pin into a dangle, grasp wire with chain nose pliers just where it exits last bead and bend wire end at 90-degree angle. Grasp bend with round nose pliers and begin to form a loop. Reposition round nose pliers and complete loop. Wrap remaining wire several times around wire exiting bead. Trim excess wire with wire cutters and tuck in cut end with chain nose pliers.
  3. Fold rat tail cord in half and slide remaining large hole accent bead, focal bead, and accent bead onto cord. Slide loop of cord into1-inch metal ring; then pull ends of cord through loop. Position beads over knot just made. Tie an overhand knot in cords above beads.
  4. Use jump rings to attach three bead dangles to metal ring.
  5. Attach “cord grabber” findings to ends of rat tail cord and flatten with pliers to secure. Attach lobster clasp to one end to complete necklace.

 

Dec 112012
 

Way back in October Lesley Watt offered up the results of a lampworking friend’s destashing. Can you say super-duper generous?  Wow!

Hey, when someone offers free beads, who am I to turn them down?

bead-giveaway

Yup, the bead I got was in this pile.  I’ll let you play Eye-Spy.  😉

The only catch was that we had to promise to make something with our treasures and share them in a blog hop on 12/12/12.  Sounded good to me!

Here’s the necklace I made:

green-and-blue-lampwork-pendant-necklace-still

I don’t think I could have picked a bead I would have liked more from that pile.  Thanks, Lesley!

green-and-blue-lampwork-pendant-necklace-close-up

Here are the other lucky recipients of Lesley’s kindness.  Be sure to check out their creations.

Lesley Watt –thegossipinggoddess.blogspot.co.uk
Cory Tompkins –tealwaterdesigns.blogspot.com
Rebecca Anderson – songbeads.blogspot.com
Marie Cramp – skyejewels.blogspot.com
Claire Braunbarth – smittenbeads.blogspot.com
Heidi Post – expostfactojewelry.blogspot.com
Tiffany Smith – southerngalsdesign.blogspot.com
Sharyl Macmillan-Nelson – sharylsjewelry.blogspot.com
Ailsa Cordner – bramalfiebeadsetc.com
Linda Landig –  lindalandig.wordpress.com
Caroline Dewison – blueberribeads.com
Renetha – lamplightcrafts.blogspot.co.uk
Kari Asbury – hippiechickdesign.blogspot.com
Niky Sayers – silverniknats.blogspot.com
Purple Cobwebs – purplecobwebs.blogspot.co.uk
Cilla Watkins – tellyourgirlfriends.com
Therese Frank – theresestreasures59.blogspot.com
Claire Ennis – clairescrystalclassics.blogspot.com
Emma – apolymerpenchant.blogspot.com
Kathy Lindemer – bay-moon-design.blogspot.com
Alicia – allprettythings.ca
Sandy Huntress – keepsakecrafts.net < You are here. 🙂
Lori Bowring Michaud – artfullyornamental.blogspot.com
Amy – copperdiem.blogspot.com
Katherine Gale – terrabeadworks.blogspot.com

Just for fun, here’s a video showing how to make this necklace and some of my thought process in the designing.

Happy creating!

Materials:

  • lampwork focal bead
  • 1 decorative head pin
  • 1 crystal bead
  • 3 silver space beads
  • 6 beads of “tangled” wire
  • 2 cube beads
  • 2 eye pins
  • 3 1-inch lengths chain
  • 2 10-inch lengths chain
  • necklace clasp
  • 15 5mm jump rings
  • 2 pair chain nose pliers
  • round nose pliers
  • wire cutters

Directions:

  1.  To make bead dangle, slide crystal bead onto decorative head pin. Follow with silver spacer, lampwork bead and 2 more silver spacer beads.  Grasp wire with chain nose pliers where it exits last spacer bead; bend wire into 90° angle.  Grasp angle with round nose pliers and start to form a loop.  Reposition round nose pliers and complete loop.  Use wire cutters to cut off excess wire where wires cross.
  2.  To make bead link, slide a cube bead onto an eye pin.  Grasp wire with chain nose pliers where it exits bead; bend wire into 90° angle.  Grasp angle with round nose pliers and start to form a loop.  Reposition round nose pliers and complete loop.  Use wire cutters to cut off excess wire where wires cross.  Repeat to make second bead link with second cube bead.
  3.  Use 5mm jump rings to connect the elements in the following order:                                                                                                                                                                  10-inch length chain > wire bead > 1-inch length chain > wire bead > cube bead link > wire bead > 1-inch length chain > wire bead > cube bead link > wire bead > 1-inch length chain > wire bead > 10-inch length chain > clasp
  4.  Attach a jump ring to end of chain opposite clasp.
  5.  Use a jump ring to attach lampwork dangle to center link of center 1-inch length of chain.

 

 

 

 

Nov 052012
 

This wooden cat bead was given to me by a friend quite some time  ago.  I immediately made it into a necklace, but then didn’t wear it very often.

cat-bead-necklace-still-1

If you have jewelry you know you ought to like, but never feel like wearing, perhaps it’s time for a makeover.

cat-bead-necklace-still

Although the cat is wired up much better than before,  I’m  still not sure about the beads I chose for this necklace.  It may have to undergo yet another redo.   Are those green beads too big?  Are the yellow ones too yellow?  Should I go with more wooden beads and natural colors to compliment the cat?

Ideas?  Thoughts for improvements? Anyone?

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Materials:

  • carved wooden bead for pendant
  • one head pin
  • several seed beads (if needed for head pin)
  • 10 inches of beads to complement wooden pendant
  • 14 inches bead stringing wire
  • two crimp beads
  • two 6-inch pieces of chain
  • four split rings
  • lobster clasp
  • round nose pliers
  • chain nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • split ring pliers
  • crimping pliers

Instructions:

  1. Slide wooden pendant onto head pin. Add seed beads if necessary to fill in space. Grasp head pin with chain nose pliers just above last bead and bend head pin at a 90-degree angle. Grasp bend with round nose pliers and wrap wire around pliers as far as possible to start to make a loop. Reposition pliers to finish loop. Keep round nose pliers in loop and wrap remaining wire several times around wire above last bead. Trim off excess wire and use chain nose pliers to tuck end in. File wire end smooth if necessary.
  2. Use split ring pliers to attach a split ring to each end of both pieces of chain. Attach a lobster clasp to one split ring.
  3. Slide a crimp bead onto bead stringing wire; slide on one split ring and slide wire back through crimp bead. Use crimping pliers to secure crimp beads.
  4. String on half of beads in desired pattern; slide on wooden bead pendant. String remaining beads, a crimp bead, and split ring from other piece of chain. Slide stringing wire back through crimp bead; pull snugly and crimp securely with crimping pliers. (Don’t pull too tightly against last beads strung or your necklace will be stiff and won’t hang nicely.)
Aug 162012
 

I purchased a dangly beaded pendant a while back, and liked it so much I decided to copy it in different colors.  I showed how I made it into a necklace in this video tutorial.

charm-dangle-necklace-still-1

Here’s the new one.

silk-ribbon-charm-dangle-necklace-still

And here’s the original. Now I can’t decide which I like best.

Bummer that I can only wear one at a time, lol.

Anyhow, enjoy the video and make one for YOU in your favorite colors.

Materials:

  • closed metal ring, approx. 1 inch to 1 ½ inches in diameter
  • five lengths of chain: 2 inches, 2 3/8 inches, 1 1/8 inches, 1 1/2 inches and 26 inches
  • seven beads for dangles
  • two charms
  • seven decorative head pins
  • five 10mm jump rings
  • three 8mm jump rings
  • lobster clasp
  • chain nose pliers
  • round nose pliers
  • wire cutters

Instructions:

  1. For bead dangles, thread a bead onto each head pin. Use chain nose and round nose pliers to make a loop at the top of each head pin. Cut off excess head pin with wire cutters.
  2. Attach lobster clasp to one end of 26-inch chain with an 8mm jump ring. Set aside.
  3. Attach bead dangles to four remaining pieces of chain in a pleasing arrangement. Use 8mm jump rings to attach charms to two of these pieces of chain.
  4. Use a 10mm jump ring to attach the top of each of these four pieces of chain to the closed metal ring.
  5. Attach final 10mm jump ring to metal ring and thread 26-inch chain through to complete necklace.

Happy Creating!