Aug 292017
 

Laying down alternating strips of surface effects to make a polymer clay veneer is a technique that is a lot of fun. As I mentioned in the video I spent a couple hours just doing the few cabochons that I showed on camera today.

crackle veneer cover

I took a closer look at them all after making the video and decided that I want to do even more experimenting and maybe make a few in a variety of shapes that will go together in a cluster to make a large statement pendant.

If you don’t have a stash of polymer clay technique sheets, now is a good time to pick a few that you’ve been wanting to try! Play and experiment and then put them together to see what combinations you like.

A few possibilities to try would be:

crackle veneers insta

Of course, there are lots, lots more.

A quick YouTube search for “polymer clay surface technique” will keep you busy for days, if not weeks and months!

I’ve use these Sculpey cabochon molds several times but have yet to use the bezel mold. That will be next up in my own experimenting, and of course for a video tutorial.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the How to Make Polymer Clay Cabochons with Crackle & Surface Effect Veneers video at YouTube.

Jun 202017
 

Today’s video is all about the best part of making creative things: experimentation and play.

Sometimes we get so caught up in following tutorials, or making things look like something else we’ve seen, that we don’t take the time to just be creative, explore new possibilities, and find our own voice.

textured beads cover

When you do sit down to this kind of creative play it’s good to just have your focus on a few simple things. This is what I show you in today’s video. I’m just making simple textured beads, but I’m playing with relatively new texture sheets. The only other thing I’m focusing on are surface effects. 

As you’ll see when you watch the video, the discoveries and revelations come from experimenting and having fun with the process.

For me, and I suspect for a lot of other artists, this is the best way to come up with techniques and processes that are uniquely my own, (or at least ones that I didn’t copy from someone else.)

By using just a quarter block, or 1/2 ounce of clay you be able to make 10 to 11 beads. Even though I made around 30 beads I found it still wasn’t enough to fully explore all the possibilities. So be sure to make plenty.

Don’t focus on making a finished product. But when you’re all done I’m sure you will be able to pull out enough pieces to make a bracelet or necklace. Don’t be surprised if they aren’t the ones you originally expected to use!

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Textured Bead Tutorial and Surface Effect Experiments-Polymer Clay at video YouTube.

Mar 072017
 

mokume gane cabochons cover

If there’s one thing polymer clayers love to do, it’s to see how well they can imitate other techniques and materials. In fact, there are entire books on imitative techniques such as Polymer Clay Gemstones: The Art of Deception and The Polymer Clay Artist’s Guide: A Directory of Mixes, Colors, Textures, Faux Finishes and Surface Effects.

mokume gane

One of the most approachable imitative techniques is that of mokume gane, which is a Japanese metalworking technique with quite beautiful results. Above is a screenshot of an image search for mokume gane. Yup, those are all metal. So many lovely things to be made!

Doing polymer clay mokume gane is really quite simple, and even if you only use a small amount of clay you can get lots of material for covering things.

blue green mokume gane

Here’s some mokume gane I made several years ago. I used it to cover pens for Christmas gifts for guys. (They were a big hit!) Even though I made at least a dozen pens I still have this chunk of lovely striated blue, green, silver and white to use in other projects.

In the mokume gane project I show in today’s video I use a very definite pattern but you can just do it randomly. One artist who has done some beautiful things with this technique is Julie Picarello. You can check out her book, Patterns in Polymer and see all the different variations she’s come up with.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Mokume Gane Cabochons-Polymer Clay Tutorial video at YouTube.