May 022017
 

sculpted seascapes cover

Today’s project is the result of combining several different ideas I’ve come across in the polymer clay world. Christie Friesen in her book Flourish showed the idea for using  silicone putty molds in a variety of ways, including making partial impressions on clay shapes. I’ve seen several projects around the inter-webs using metal charms and bits of clay to make a little wearable scenes. And of course I’m sure you’ve all seen lots of projects incorporating spirals and scrolls and swirls.

I call my project “Sculpted Seascapes,” since they all seem to have a beachy theme, but you could make yours any style you like. Creating the base goes fairly quickly, but adding all of the details can take a while. I find it to be a relaxing, meditative process. Don’t forget to stand back on occasion and take a look at the piece as a whole. It’s easy to get lost in all those little details!

Although you can pop out the metal charms and other mixed media used in your piece after baking and glue them, I prefer to arrange bits of clay around them so that they are trapped in there once the clay is hardened by baking. It’s a much more secure bond than trusting in glue, which at times can be unreliable.

If you incorporate things that you found perhaps on a nature walk or vacation, you’ll have a special, wearable momento of that time.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Sculpted Seascapes-Polymer Clay & Mixed Media Tutorial at YouTube.

Apr 252017
 

filigrees n roses cover

I was hesitant at first to do a video with polymer clay roses as they seem so very basic to me. However after thinking about it I decided to go ahead because even if you’ve made polymer clay roses before you may not have thought of using them in this way.

I love the vintage look you get when putting these delicate flowers on metal and filigree pieces!

As you can see, the possibilities for application are endless. I made just a few pieces of jewelry, but you could use them to decorate all sorts of things. Think about covering boxes, home dec, pens… anything that doesn’t get too much handling, as they are rather delicate.

One thing I forgot to mention in the video was that for the earrings I only used six petals in addition to the center to keep them small and in proportion to the findings. It’s really simply a matter of using as many petals as you need to get the fullness and shape you want.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the Filigree ‘n’ Roses Polymer Clay Jewelry Tutorial at YouTube.

Apr 142017
 

ff coiled hidden bail

There are lots of different ways to hang polymer clay pendants from necklace cord. Some of the more obvious are adding a hole, adding a loop to the pendant or embedding some kind of metal finding. But sometimes the design just doesn’t warrant it. Sometimes you don’t want any of the findings to show on the front.

I’ve seen lots of different styles of polymer clay bails pressed onto the backs of pendants, but they can often be bulky. Today I’m going to show you a quick and easy way to secure a hidden, low-profile bail to the back of your polymer clay pendant.

If you don’t have the coiling gizmo to make your coils you can wrap your wire around anything cylindrical. But using this cool tool will make your work much quicker and it’s easier to get consistent results.

Watch my video on Coiled Wire Beads and Other Findings, which includes how to use the Coiling Gizmo.

Remember to first plan your stringing cord so that you can make a wire coil of the appropriate size. The thicker your coil,  by the way, the thicker the backing of your clay should be. But don’t embed your coil so deeply that you can no longer fit in your cording!

As I mention in the video, all the pendants I use for demonstration in the video were made with directions from Christi Friesen’s book, Flourish.

Tools and Materials:

Enjoy the video and happy creating!

Watch the How to Make a Hidden Coil Bail For Pendants-Friday Findings Jewelry Tutorial at YouTube.